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Minute Men and Their World

ritasv:

OshKosh2014FFIC-3935 by James Bokvoy Photography

ritasv:

OshKosh2014FFIC-3935 by James Bokvoy Photography

(Source: Flickr / nadadventist)

Ferguson rifle dating to the American Revolutionary War. Patrick Ferguson was a British officer during the Revolutionary War who commanded a detachment of light infantry drawn from the 6th and 14th Regiments of Foot. He designed a breech loading rifle that was the earliest breech loading rifle to be used by the British Army. Although the rifle was far more effective than both the Brown Bess musket or any muzzle loading rifle, they were expensive to produce and were regarded as not tough enough for general field use.

After his death at the Battle of King’s Mountain, the Ferguson rifle was phased out and not reintroduced. The British Army wouldn’t begin to use breech loaders on a regular basis until the mid 19th century. 

The limited production of the Ferguson rifle makes it a rare weapon today. This example is in the National Army Museum

This particular item highlights the diversity of 18th century America. This is a charm, written in Gaelic, with the owner’s name written on the opposite side in English. The English side says “Dougald McFarland Moore County 1750.” Moore county was formed out of Cumberland county in 1784, so that inscription, at least, was written post Revolutionary War. 
Over 1/3rd of the colonists taking up arms for the “rights of Englishmen” in 1775 weren’t English. They were a mixture of German, Dutch, Irish, Scottish, and Scotch-Irish.
There were enough German speakers in Virginia alone to field a battalion of German speakers. 
As for the charm itself, this is what the North Carolina Digital Collections has to say about the translation:

Scholars have given somewhat varied translations interpretations of the substance of the Gaelic charm, which calls upon the miraculous power of “Calum Cille”, assisted by the “Father, Son, and Holy Spirit”, to banish harm. “Calum Cille”, is the Gaelic name for Saint Columba. Born around 520 A.D. in Ireland, Calum Cille is credited with bringing Celtic Christianity, to Scotland. Beginning in 1739, large groups of Scots Highlanders settled in Cumberland County and other areas along the rivers in the upper Cape Fear Valley. Towards the end of the 18th century, Gaelic was still spoken in the region. Although landing in North Carolina marked a new life for the Highlanders, certain Highland customs and beliefs persisted, as shown by this remnant of Celtic Christianity.
Text of charm:
[Gaelic Charm] In the name of the Father and Son and holy g[host]…said [interlined]nach [return to text] a le(i)c san as huile murt [adh?]…a dhorche galar cull…ia nuach nid [h?] … mein veatha [?] nach … faic is nach faic eh [Interliner note probably p.r.7.n.d. =paidir rlimhe gus na dheigh] aire in ui[s]ge agus in tuillnodoch [ann[ ara ghrea. Chee is nach leasaich ni e [o] lann ia are nill egheire nial co mored She uisge agus Shee neag[h] …in thallt. Adeir habl[?] gach art hog e yeatsa gach tinneas a gach peannaid is S. Lea. Dia s coach mala [unfinished]. [English translation] In the name of the Father the Son and the Holy Ghost [amen] This protects him [i.e. the bearer] against all murder all kinds of disease of the back [N.B. usually “the stone” or “Grave”] [?gravel]… and in the middle of his life whether he sees it or not [the interlinear note is common in the MS- a prayer before and after taking medicine or reading this or undertaking any task of importance]and against water and flood, pain of every kind [which one sees]; and will protect him from sword if he is not rising up [text is broken here] [?]. Let him put six [measures?] of water and six … to the joint [i.e. the damaged or ailing joint in his body]HABL [?] says that he raised from you every evil, every sickness and every penalty and… God and all … burdens [unfinished text]

This particular item highlights the diversity of 18th century America. This is a charm, written in Gaelic, with the owner’s name written on the opposite side in English. The English side says “Dougald McFarland Moore County 1750.” Moore county was formed out of Cumberland county in 1784, so that inscription, at least, was written post Revolutionary War. 

Over 1/3rd of the colonists taking up arms for the “rights of Englishmen” in 1775 weren’t English. They were a mixture of German, Dutch, Irish, Scottish, and Scotch-Irish.

There were enough German speakers in Virginia alone to field a battalion of German speakers. 

As for the charm itself, this is what the North Carolina Digital Collections has to say about the translation:

Scholars have given somewhat varied translations interpretations of the substance of the Gaelic charm, which calls upon the miraculous power of “Calum Cille”, assisted by the “Father, Son, and Holy Spirit”, to banish harm. “Calum Cille”, is the Gaelic name for Saint Columba. Born around 520 A.D. in Ireland, Calum Cille is credited with bringing Celtic Christianity, to Scotland. Beginning in 1739, large groups of Scots Highlanders settled in Cumberland County and other areas along the rivers in the upper Cape Fear Valley. Towards the end of the 18th century, Gaelic was still spoken in the region. Although landing in North Carolina marked a new life for the Highlanders, certain Highland customs and beliefs persisted, as shown by this remnant of Celtic Christianity.

Text of charm:

[Gaelic Charm] In the name of the Father and Son and holy g[host]…said [interlined]nach [return to text] a le(i)c san as huile murt [adh?]…a dhorche galar cull…ia nuach nid [h?] … mein veatha [?] nach … faic is nach faic eh [Interliner note probably p.r.7.n.d. =paidir rlimhe gus na dheigh] aire in ui[s]ge agus in tuillnodoch [ann[ ara ghrea. Chee is nach leasaich ni e [o] lann ia are nill egheire nial co mored She uisge agus Shee neag[h] …in thallt. Adeir habl[?] gach art hog e yeatsa gach tinneas a gach peannaid is S. Lea. Dia s coach mala [unfinished]. [English translation] In the name of the Father the Son and the Holy Ghost [amen] This protects him [i.e. the bearer] against all murder all kinds of disease of the back [N.B. usually “the stone” or “Grave”] [?gravel]… and in the middle of his life whether he sees it or not [the interlinear note is common in the MS- a prayer before and after taking medicine or reading this or undertaking any task of importance]and against water and flood, pain of every kind [which one sees]; and will protect him from sword if he is not rising up [text is broken here] [?]. Let him put six [measures?] of water and six … to the joint [i.e. the damaged or ailing joint in his body]HABL [?] says that he raised from you every evil, every sickness and every penalty and… God and all … burdens [unfinished text]

(Source: digital.ncdcr.gov)

In case you ever need to get up close and personal with your pistols, this pair comes complete with bayonet.
Late 18th century.
Soldier’s hut at Jockey Hollow, Morristown. This is where the Continental Army would spend the winter of 1780-1781, which was one of the coldest winters on record. That year the Continental Army faced some pretty severe food shortages, as well as it’s usual problems of clothing shortages. 
A soldier’s gear circa 1775.

thegentlemanscloset:

What would it look like if you took 18th century reenactors and did a photoshoot in the style of Vogue or Glamour. That’s what they asked at Colonial Williamsburg, and this was the result.

Top: 

Actor-interpreter Dennis Watson wears a yellow-silk floral-embroidered coat and breeches with a coordinated white-silk satin waistcoat. The embroidery pattern is taken from a purple-silk court suit in Colonial Williamsburg’s collections.

Middle left: 

Actor-interpreter Scott Green wears a lace ruffled shirt and stock under pink satin smallclothes with a purple taffeta coat embellished in silver embroidery and spangles. The embroidery design is taken from a suit in Colonial Williamsburg’s collections.

Middle right:

Ken Treese, patternmaker at Colonial Williamsburg’s Costume Design Center, sports regalia constructed for an interpretation of Lord Cornwallis for the event “Under the Redcoat.” The British major general’s uniform is a regimental coat of red wool broadcloth faced with blue and embroidered in gold, a military cocked hat trimmed with gold lace and black-silk satin bow cockade, a pair of gold embroidered epaulettes with gold bullion fringe, buff linen smallclothes, black silk neck stock, and smallsword.

Bottom:

Journeyman silversmith Preston Jones in re-created livery from Virginia Governor Dunmore’s household—robin’s-egg-blue wool broadcloth waistcoat and coat trimmed in silver with brown wool broadcloth cuffs, collar, and breeches.

Pocket-sized sundial and compass. This is in the Morristown museum.

Roman numerals indicate the time of day around the face. Arabic numerals are underneath. Engraved. Dial indicator also engraved. On the underside, a flower design is engraved and “Roch blongeau/Paris 1673.”